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Old 07-16-2014, 04:25 PM   #13
truckeez
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Cruzeville
Posts: 215
Re: Truck Images Circa 1930

anyhow this is the info i have..

When their passenger car business hit the skids at the start of the Depression, General Motors Chevrolet division quickly switched gears in an effort to build sales of their commercial chassis, and purchased Martin-Parry’s Indianapolis operations in April of 1930 for $900,000. Up until that time, only cab and chassis had been available from the factory. The 1931 Chevrolet truck catalog offered a complete line of standard bodies for their ˝-ton chassis; pickup, panel truck, and canopy express, as well as an offering of canopy express and stake bodies for the 1-˝-ton chassis.

Under General Motors’ ownership, Martin-Parry’s Indianapolis plant was renamed the Chevrolet Body Division. For a number of years, US-made Chevrolet passenger cars had bodies built by Fisher Body and Chevrolet and GMC trucks used bodies built by Chevrolet Body. Later body tags indicate that the Indianapolis plant was now the Indianapolis, Indiana plant of the Chevrolet Division of General Motors Corp.

Most of the firm’s York, PA plant was shuttered, although they continued to produce a small number of bodies and other products into the late 30s. At the start of WWII, Martin-Parry furnished the Allies with field gun conversion kits that allowed formerly horse-drawn artillery to be towed by more modern methods. Each kit consisted of two pneumatic-tired steel disc wheels on stub axles carried on a cranked adapter which fitted over the end of the original axletree. Included were the necessary radius rods, brake gear, layers' seat brackets, etc. needed to enable the guns to be safely towed at speeds up to 30 mph.
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