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Old 10-30-2017, 03:46 PM   #26
72HuggerK20
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Re: Paint gun for my compressor size

Now I'm not sure what MARTINSR will have to say about this, but I honestly believe that bc/cc is easier to shoot than single stage.

My reasoning for this is that you have a chance to fix mistakes before it's too late. Say if you are to get a run or a few dirt nibs in basecoat, you have some time to fix them before you clear the panel. Plus, if you do have to fix something in basecoat, you just need to blend a little more base over the repair spot and you'll never be able to tell it happened...unless you're messing with really heavy metallics or pearls.

In clearcoat, you have the chance to fix dirt nibs and runs without re-painting the entire panel.

Even professionals make mistakes. It's how good you are at fixing the mistakes you do make and minimizing them as well as you can that makes you a better painter.

Base/clear is a little more expensive up front, but because you're using two separate materials for color and gloss, you'll find it's much easier to use. You only have to worry about coverage when shooting basecoat. It doesn't need to be laid down super flat or anything. Clearcoat, you don't need to worry about even color distribution or metallic flop or anything like that. You only have to worry about laying down a nice even coat with minimal orange peel.

Clearcoat is also much easier to sand and buff because you will run less of a risk of cutting through. If you have a metallic color, you can't buff it in single stage since you'll be cutting into the tops of the metallic pieces. In bc/cc, they're protected by clear.

Not trying to steer you away from single stage, because I don't care what you choose. It's your project. I'm just giving a little information from my experiences in the past. I personally wouldn't do anything but bc/cc on a vehicle ever in the future. It's just that much easier.
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Old 10-30-2017, 04:16 PM   #27
MARTINSR
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Re: Paint gun for my compressor size

Quote:
Originally Posted by 72HuggerK20 View Post
Now I'm not sure what MARTINSR will have to say about this, but I honestly believe that bc/cc is easier to shoot than single stage.

My reasoning for this is that you have a chance to fix mistakes before it's too late. Say if you are to get a run or a few dirt nibs in basecoat, you have some time to fix them before you clear the panel. Plus, if you do have to fix something in basecoat, you just need to blend a little more base over the repair spot and you'll never be able to tell it happened...unless you're messing with really heavy metallics or pearls.

In clearcoat, you have the chance to fix dirt nibs and runs without re-painting the entire panel.

Even professionals make mistakes. It's how good you are at fixing the mistakes you do make and minimizing them as well as you can that makes you a better painter.

Base/clear is a little more expensive up front, but because you're using two separate materials for color and gloss, you'll find it's much easier to use. You only have to worry about coverage when shooting basecoat. It doesn't need to be laid down super flat or anything. Clearcoat, you don't need to worry about even color distribution or metallic flop or anything like that. You only have to worry about laying down a nice even coat with minimal orange peel.

Clearcoat is also much easier to sand and buff because you will run less of a risk of cutting through. If you have a metallic color, you can't buff it in single stage since you'll be cutting into the tops of the metallic pieces. In bc/cc, they're protected by clear.

Not trying to steer you away from single stage, because I don't care what you choose. It's your project. I'm just giving a little information from my experiences in the past. I personally wouldn't do anything but bc/cc on a vehicle ever in the future. It's just that much easier.
You are absolutely correct. Everything you said is spot on. BC/CC is like sitting on the couch with a beer compared to the pressure of applying three coats perfect with a SS.

Brian
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Old 10-30-2017, 04:31 PM   #28
Harleymike
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Thumbs up Re: Paint gun for my compressor size

Quote:
Originally Posted by 72HuggerK20 View Post
Now I'm not sure what MARTINSR will have to say about this, but I honestly believe that bc/cc is easier to shoot than single stage.

My reasoning for this is that you have a chance to fix mistakes before it's too late. Say if you are to get a run or a few dirt nibs in basecoat, you have some time to fix them before you clear the panel. Plus, if you do have to fix something in basecoat, you just need to blend a little more base over the repair spot and you'll never be able to tell it happened...unless you're messing with really heavy metallics or pearls.

In clearcoat, you have the chance to fix dirt nibs and runs without re-painting the entire panel.

Even professionals make mistakes. It's how good you are at fixing the mistakes you do make and minimizing them as well as you can that makes you a better painter.

Base/clear is a little more expensive up front, but because you're using two separate materials for color and gloss, you'll find it's much easier to use. You only have to worry about coverage when shooting basecoat. It doesn't need to be laid down super flat or anything. Clearcoat, you don't need to worry about even color distribution or metallic flop or anything like that. You only have to worry about laying down a nice even coat with minimal orange peel.

Clearcoat is also much easier to sand and buff because you will run less of a risk of cutting through. If you have a metallic color, you can't buff it in single stage since you'll be cutting into the tops of the metallic pieces. In bc/cc, they're protected by clear.

Not trying to steer you away from single stage, because I don't care what you choose. It's your project. I'm just giving a little information from my experiences in the past. I personally wouldn't do anything but bc/cc on a vehicle ever in the future. It's just that much easier.


Thanks guys. Appreciate the input. I see what your saying about the BC/CC.Makes sense to me. And Im sure there will be mistakes.
Hoping to let my son spray some of it also. The base clear is looking more positive as I learn about this more and more.

I'll keep searching. I should be spraying the inside of the cab first. Hopefully late winter.
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Old 11-15-2017, 02:03 PM   #29
andreas_kc
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Re: Paint gun for my compressor size

I'm no paint/body expert. The last few months have been my first painting experiences. I am using the cheaper Eastwood gun you are looking at. I've been happy with it and also have a small 2.5hp compressor.

The gun DOES get shipped to you in a pretty dirty state. They paint it black and there is a bunch of left over black mess in the internals of the gun. It's not to difficult to clean out, but you must make sure you do.

Here are some pics of things I've painted recently with the Eastwood LT gun...



You can see what the pattern looks like.... I don't have much experience, but I'd think it could be on the smaller size than other guns... This is using a 1.5 tip with an epoxy primer.



The paint booth had a pretty good compressor system, so it wasn't too big a deal. At home, doing a door here or parts there is no big deal. With a 2.5hp, 30gal tank, it would kick on once per coat on a door.
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Old 11-15-2017, 02:09 PM   #30
andreas_kc
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Re: Paint gun for my compressor size

On paints, I've been using SPI which is pretty competitive price wise. Again don't know much but it seems to be pretty quality paint. They have a pretty limited base color selection, but have everything else. Plus you can use a different urethane base no problem at all. The door above was all SPI with a Nason brand base.

Only real reference I have is using Nason paint which is similarly priced. I seemed to need 1-2 more coats for anything in the Nason paint system vs the SPI stuff would cover in less coats.

The only gripe I have which maybe is normal was the epoxy primer does not cure under 65 degrees which makes it so I can't paint in my garage/carport now that the weather is colder.... and it is why I had to drag my stuff to a paint booth to get it epoxied.
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