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Old 07-16-2018, 10:54 PM   #1
kiwikid
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drip rails

Has anybody installed drip rails from Brothers Truck? they say exact O E M fit any info would be appreciated thanks in advance
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Old 07-17-2018, 11:27 AM   #2
MARTINSR
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Re: drip rails

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwikid View Post
Has anybody installed drip rails from Brothers Truck? they say exact O E M fit any info would be appreciated thanks in advance
Well, as a friend of mine once say when he pulled a part out for his 65 Corvette of the box it was just mailed to him in:

"If they wanted to be honest, instead of saying Exactly as Original in the catalog they would say, Similar to Original, can be used if nothing else is available."

I think that is about as profound as you can get.

These originally were a pain I have to assume that the reproduction part is going to be a pain too.

Brian
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Old 08-13-2018, 12:16 PM   #3
LH Lead-Foot
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Re: drip rails

I like the look of the drip rail trim and I also agree it is going to be a pain. Working at a dealer on new vehicles, some repairs required removal and re-installation of exterior trim. I would use masking tape to keep from scraping new paint. While tabs or plastic retainers is more common, the old school drip rail trim is friction fit which raises certain issues.
#1 Will it scrape some paint of the top or bottom edge when rolling it on? Both.
#2 Drip rails are not perfect from the factory so more attention maybe needed to make all things equal which takes time & effort, before painting.
#3 Get a buddy that does not loose their temper easy, otherwise it will get bent.
#4 I was told years ago, that plastic wrap was taped in place, then the molding was rolled onto the rail. Then the plastic was trimmed away after the install.
Never saw it done but sounds good.

I worked with a guy who started a GM with a broom the day after he graduated from high school and still is there. His dad worked at a truck plant for 20+ years, before they moved it out of town. His dad is gone, but Bobby G. can recall many things he saw and heard how things went together.
I never work at Goodyear, but 3 family member did. We went to open house events to see tires being made and the equipment used. Amazing, but if most saw how, they would not trust tires again!
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Old 08-13-2018, 01:05 PM   #4
MARTINSR
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Re: drip rails

LOL, I as at a car show a while ago after I had welded my drip rails back on. I looked at how one fit down to the body line and it was way higher than what I did, at least a quarter inch higher. I wasn't upset that I made a mistake because I think mine looked better anyway. The next one I looked at it was down where I did mine! LOL And these were original trucks. So, yes, they are all different. The fit and finish back then was NOT like it is now that is for sure!

Brian
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1948 Chevy pickup
Chopped, Sectioned, 1953 Corvette 235 powered. Once was even 401 Buick mid engined with the carburetor right between the seats!
Bought with paper route money in 1973 when I was 15.

"Fan of most anything that moves human beings"
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Old 08-21-2018, 03:14 PM   #5
tdangle
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Re: drip rails

I replaced the drivers side on my truck a few years ago. Bought the replacement from Brothers. Honestly I don't recall it being much of a problem and I am definitely not an expert welder or anything else.
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Old 08-22-2018, 12:45 PM   #6
LH Lead-Foot
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Re: drip rails

Yes, I agree with fit, finish, panel gaps and even trim on the 60's into early 70's trucks. These vehicles where primarily the working mans utility on the job site, farm and hauling materials to the job site. So what happened, they where built heavy but not high end fitment.
I have never installed stainless steel trim on the drip rails of any brand, although I will make that purchase when it become behind my other priorities. I have owned a MIG since 1984 and ran miles of wire thru it while watching the price of shield gas go up about $22 each year for a 125 cu.ft. tank 75/25%.

I can't imagine welding on the the drip rail that had been remove or shaved by a previous owner, but I have seen and heard it has been a trend. A smoother look, less wind noise or what ever the reason.

My son had be weld up the rear inner and outer panels on the back of his El Camino. I thought he was crazy. I had to hammer the edges together & cut strips of steel, tack to a weld wire, then slide it in sideways to have a backer to weld to. Even with low setting and using 0.30 wire, it took hours.

I like chrome or SS on a vehicle. My 67 C10 has OEM drip rails over the windshield and doors. They have never been damaged, but I still took time to straighten them, align straight and even a little grinding. While the edges of the skins over lap a little, it still took some effort to look flat to accept SS drip rail trim in the future. I just know that a the trim is friction fit, I will be nervous but the 3 piece trim on with the little joint clips...while hoping not to scrape off any paint.

I took extra effort to clean the top side seam sealer that was OEM and had to crack, separate and a few areas that where really thin. I use 3M seam sealer from the roof side to finish of this joint to prevent leaks. I use 3M glazing sealer, a black goo in a caulking gun to seal the windshield rubber to prevent leak also. Has anyone done this to help eliminate windshield leaks? They sell it. I use the heavy paint stick ground to a thin tapper to slide under the rubber to lift and seal. While it was a few inches at a time, it was still worth it. The rubber was new and hard area was the top, under the drip rail. Never sealed the bottom. Hope driving rain a road speed does not prove this wrong.

Regards everyone who have gone far beyond the normal fabrication during their builds. I see a lot of excellent work, ideas and execution of various task. Hats off!
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Last edited by LH Lead-Foot; 08-22-2018 at 01:03 PM. Reason: adding photo
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