The 1947 - Present Chevrolet & GMC Truck Message Board Network







Register or Log In To remove these advertisements.

Go Back   The 1947 - Present Chevrolet & GMC Truck Message Board Network > Info Center > FAQ Truck Tech > Electrical

Web 67-72chevytrucks.com


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-15-2015, 04:14 PM   #1
Nima
Blue 67
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: CA, WA and in between!
Posts: 881
Another electrical question

Hi:

Does a 220 outlet has (or suppose to have) a white wire? My 220 outlet has only 3 wires: black, red and ground. No white wire is needed?!
__________________
1967 C20, 350 with 3 on tree, 2/14 dual exhaust. 4 wheel disc brake; finally done
2005 Silverado 2500, 4x4 Duramax, 4" MBRP exhaust,
1972 Nova (new project)4 door, 6 banger with powerglide tranny.
Nima is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2015, 04:55 PM   #2
truckster
Senior Member
 
truckster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Orem, Utah
Posts: 4,333
Re: Another electrical question

A single-phase 220 circuit has two hot wires (red and black) and a ground.
truckster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2015, 09:30 PM   #3
Nima
Blue 67
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: CA, WA and in between!
Posts: 881
Re: Another electrical question

Thank you.
So there is no neutral on a 220 outlet, the red connects where the white usually connects?
__________________
1967 C20, 350 with 3 on tree, 2/14 dual exhaust. 4 wheel disc brake; finally done
2005 Silverado 2500, 4x4 Duramax, 4" MBRP exhaust,
1972 Nova (new project)4 door, 6 banger with powerglide tranny.
Nima is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2015, 11:41 PM   #4
truckster
Senior Member
 
truckster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Orem, Utah
Posts: 4,333
Re: Another electrical question

They're totally different. Think of it this way: the electrical service brought into your house is 220 volts single phase. In your breaker box, you have two strips of breakers; each one is for one "side" of the phase. In other words, the two phases are 180 degrees out of sync. When you wire a 110v circuit, it's connected to one of the phases on the hot side (black wire) and goes to ground through the neutral (white) wire, which completes the circuit. The bare copper wire is a ground, which is there for safety's sake.

When you connect both phases (really, both sides of one sine wave), you end up with 220v; one phase is represented by the black wire and the other by the red wire. Since the circuit is completed by the two hot wires, you don't need a neutral. Again, the ground is there as a safety measure. So a 220v outlet is different from a 110v outlet, and you should never (NEVER!) substitute one for the other.

To make things a little more confusing, some 220v outlets (such as for electric clothes dryers or stoves) DO have a neutral leg, and as a result will have a 4-prong cord instead of a 3-prong cord. That's because those appliances use both 220v (for the burners, for example) and 110v (for the clock). The older electrical code allowed for the use of the ground wire in that type of circuit to complete the 110v leg, but current code requires a separate neutral wire. It is permissible, however, if you have a newer appliance and an older outlet to use a 4-prong to 3-prong pigtail

I hope this helps.
truckster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 09:01 AM   #5
ERASER5
Registered User
 
ERASER5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 4,861
Re: Another electrical question

If the white wire exits, then in the future, you can split the 220V into two 110v circuits without having to pull new wire.

For now, cap the white wire with a wirenut and fold it into the back of the box. A future owner will thank you.
__________________
'70 GMC C1500 LWB
Power disc brakes. WooHoo!
Posi 6 Lug Dana 60
ERASER5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 09:59 AM   #6
truckster
Senior Member
 
truckster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Orem, Utah
Posts: 4,333
Re: Another electrical question

Quote:
Originally Posted by ERASER5 View Post
If the white wire exits, then in the future, you can split the 220V into two 110v circuits without having to pull new wire.

For now, cap the white wire with a wirenut and fold it into the back of the box. A future owner will thank you.
The OP was concerned with the lack of a white wire, so there wouldn't be anything to cap.
truckster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 10:20 AM   #7
ERASER5
Registered User
 
ERASER5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 4,861
Re: Another electrical question

Yep. Missed that. Need more caffeine.
__________________
'70 GMC C1500 LWB
Power disc brakes. WooHoo!
Posi 6 Lug Dana 60
ERASER5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 12:26 PM   #8
Nima
Blue 67
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: CA, WA and in between!
Posts: 881
Re: Another electrical question

Quote:
Originally Posted by truckster View Post
They're totally different. Think of it this way: the electrical service brought into your house is 220 volts single phase. In your breaker box, you have two strips of breakers; each one is for one "side" of the phase. In other words, the two phases are 180 degrees out of sync. When you wire a 110v circuit, it's connected to one of the phases on the hot side (black wire) and goes to ground through the neutral (white) wire, which completes the circuit. The bare copper wire is a ground, which is there for safety's sake.

When you connect both phases (really, both sides of one sine wave), you end up with 220v; one phase is represented by the black wire and the other by the red wire. Since the circuit is completed by the two hot wires, you don't need a neutral. Again, the ground is there as a safety measure. So a 220v outlet is different from a 110v outlet, and you should never (NEVER!) substitute one for the other.


To make things a little more confusing, some 220v outlets (such as for electric clothes dryers or stoves) DO have a neutral leg, and as a result will have a 4-prong cord instead of a 3-prong cord. That's because those appliances use both 220v (for the burners, for example) and 110v (for the clock). The older electrical code allowed for the use of the ground wire in that type of circuit to complete the 110v leg, but current code requires a separate neutral wire. It is permissible, however, if you have a newer appliance and an older outlet to use a 4-prong to 3-prong pigtail

I hope this helps.
Thank you for simple but detailed explanation. It is very helpful.

Thank you all.
__________________
1967 C20, 350 with 3 on tree, 2/14 dual exhaust. 4 wheel disc brake; finally done
2005 Silverado 2500, 4x4 Duramax, 4" MBRP exhaust,
1972 Nova (new project)4 door, 6 banger with powerglide tranny.
Nima is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2015, 01:10 AM   #9
motornut
78K & 79C Jimmys
 
motornut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Ottawa Ont CANADA
Posts: 7,891
Re: Another electrical question

my dryer the 240 VAC is split to two 120s in the dryer,1 runs the drum ,2 the heat

stove is 240 split as well,
it just spits the power down to front burners/back,lower bake /upper broil.
__________________
John http://www.youtube.com/user/TheMotornut
1978 Suburban4X2-hit while parked RIPzez
1978 GMCJimmy4X4-350/203http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/s...=421767&page=4
1979 GMCJimmy4X2-305/350http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/s...=1#post5200107
1987 Suburban4X4-writeoff hit while parked RIPzez
1988 Suburban4X4-writeoff hit while parked RIPzez
1989 Suburban4X2 - square igloo/SOLD
2002 Fleetwood
2005 Malibu hit by City bus,2nd time a write-off(01/15/16)
2010 Dodge Van-writeoff hit while parked(01/14/15)

Now I just buy shorter trucks!
Love em low,but get me higher
motornut is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright 1997-2013 67-72chevytrucks.com