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Old 07-02-2015, 09:09 PM   #1
Slow Build
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Can anyone identify these Trailing Arms?

I bought these trailing arms in a package deal. He thought everything was CPP but some of the other stuff wasn't. He said that he got them in 2005. Does anyone recognize what brand these are, or are they home fabbed? They look fairly HD but I'm wondering if they would articulate like they should.
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Old 07-02-2015, 10:08 PM   #2
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Re: Can anyone identify these Trailing Arms?

Home/shop built.
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Old 07-04-2015, 01:37 PM   #3
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Re: Can anyone identify these Trailing Arms?

Those look pretty stout - probably wouldn't articulate or flex much (if any), but that obviously depends on the gauge of the tubing used to make them. You could always use some swivel bushings up front. Hotchkis makes a swivel trailing arm bushing for C10 trailing arms - of course that depends on the size of the bushing eye in those trailing arms you have.
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Old 07-21-2015, 04:52 PM   #4
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Re: Can anyone identify these Trailing Arms?

I guess the big question is if I can trust them. The eye side looks pretty good but I don't know about the axle mounting end. The welds look OK, but not great. I'm just don't know if butt welding on a training arm is safe. I will definitely have to do a little more research before any plans to install them.

The swivel bushings would probably be a good idea. I wonder if they would add any harshness to the ride since I'm guessing it's all metal instead of rubber or poly.
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Name: Rich
Current Ride: 1964 C-10 Short Fleetside
Daily Driver: 2005 GMC crew cab short fleetside /2001 Chevy Tahoe
Past GM Trucks:
1959 GMC short stepside
1968 GMC short stepside-4x4
1973 Chevy short stepside
1989 Chevy short fleetside-reg cab
1993 Chevy short fleetside-Xcab
2002 Chevy short fleetside-Xcab

Save the dinosaurs, use synthetic oil.
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Old 07-22-2015, 10:13 AM   #5
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Re: Can anyone identify these Trailing Arms?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slow Build View Post
I guess the big question is if I can trust them. The eye side looks pretty good but I don't know about the axle mounting end. The welds look OK, but not great. I'm just don't know if butt welding on a training arm is safe. I will definitely have to do a little more research before any plans to install them.

The swivel bushings would probably be a good idea. I wonder if they would add any harshness to the ride since I'm guessing it's all metal instead of rubber or poly.
I'm OCD about being safe.... I would run those as long as some type of swivel joint is used up front.
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89CCDually-Driver/Tow Truck
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All Fleetsides

Building a small, high rpm engine
with the perfect bore, stroke and rod ratio is very impressive...
like a highly skilled Morrocan sword fighter with a Damascus Steel Scimitar.

Cubic inches is like Indiana Jones with a cheap pistol....
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Old 07-23-2015, 04:25 AM   #6
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Re: Can anyone identify these Trailing Arms?

I think I just found these arms at the classicparts.com.
The picture is small but they look like mine. I feel safer about using them now.

http://www.classicparts.com/1960-72-...tinfo/74-871/#
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Name: Rich
Current Ride: 1964 C-10 Short Fleetside
Daily Driver: 2005 GMC crew cab short fleetside /2001 Chevy Tahoe
Past GM Trucks:
1959 GMC short stepside
1968 GMC short stepside-4x4
1973 Chevy short stepside
1989 Chevy short fleetside-reg cab
1993 Chevy short fleetside-Xcab
2002 Chevy short fleetside-Xcab

Save the dinosaurs, use synthetic oil.
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