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-   -   Restoring Rusty (https://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/showthread.php?t=645440)

enaberif 03-22-2016 05:53 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregski (Post 7531753)
my buddy who used to run it in his old GTO said couple guys at two different shops said don't do it cause Diesel motor oils contain harmful detergents for gasoline engines, so the plot thickens

You will hear people say Rotella is and you will hear people say Rotella is bad. You can buy a ZDDP supplement to add to any old type of oil if your that worried.

For example:
http://zddplus.com/

68Timber 03-22-2016 06:14 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Doesn't Comp Cams still sell their break-in oil? I can't imagine they wouldn't. Break it in with that and be done with it, run something like Valvoline VR1 or anything w/some zddp in it after that. One episode of pretrol primates they blew up a new motor trying to break it in with cheap motor oil and a bottle of zddp additive. They used a good break in oil after getting it rebuilt again. Use something decent made for break-in and fuggetaboutit.

Jake Wade 03-22-2016 07:59 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Greg, Get some of this:

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/crn-99002-1/overview/

Coat all the lobes with it, rub it in good, Also the bottoms of the lifters before installation.

Has served me well for years.

Valvoline VR-1 conventional oil in the silver bottle or Brad Penn breakin oil is what I use for flat tappets.

hatzie 03-22-2016 09:03 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregski (Post 7531753)
my buddy who used to run it in his old GTO said couple guys at two different shops said don't do it cause Diesel motor oils contain harmful detergents for gasoline engines, so the plot thickens

Complete baloney...
The bearings in a diesel engine are made from the same steel copper and babbit as the gasoline engines.

Detergent in the oil keeps crud in suspension and can knock loose filth in a sludged up motor. Diesel oils have more detergents to keep the carbon suspended so it doesn't sludge up your motor to begin with. The origination of this rumor is probably that you can get into real trouble on old poorly maintained motors that were run on non detergent or poor detergent oils by changing to high detergent diesel oils... Detergents and dispersants tend to knock a lot of the sludge loose in a hurry and plug stuff up.

Diesel oils tend to have more generous quantities of anti-wear additives like Boron, Zinc & Phosphorous (Zinc Dialkyl Dithio Phospahte), and Molybdenum than Spark ignition only oils. With the tightened emissions requirements put in place around 2007 they don't have the phosphorous or zinc levels they used to.

If you're installing a new cam I'd run a break in oil like Joe Gibbs till it's fully broken in and then run the Rotella T5.
I run 5W40 Rotella T6 in my LS4 Impala, 2 6.5L diesels, and my Polaris Sportsman 500HO ATV. The 6.2L CUCV and the LDT 465 Continental in the M35A2 get 15W40 Rotella T5.

Look at the API seal on the back of the jug.
Rotella T5 is at least SM and CJ-4 rated. S is Spark ignition C is Compression (diesel) ignition.

Gregski 03-22-2016 09:31 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
3 Attachment(s)
well gentlemen when the Greg gets in the zone he gets in the zone, I'm sure you've been there where you just put you head down and git 'er done, well today was such a day, a good day, so lets get to the updates

came home from work and turned up the paint booth to 61*F plus and dropped the humidity to the low 40% and busted out my paint guns

check it out this dude's shooting primer on his tin first, he's Legit!

painted the timing cover

Gregski 03-22-2016 09:33 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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painted the valve covers

Gregski 03-22-2016 09:35 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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even the oil pan joined the party, for a light dusting of a touch up

Gregski 03-22-2016 09:41 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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a while back the Alan Grove knock off mid mount alternator bracket showed up so it got a coat of sexy Semi Flat black paint too

the bracket is painted black in the last pic, whether the sun wants us to see it that way or not, lol

Gregski 03-22-2016 09:45 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
than the fraternal twins showed up and they wanted to get in on the action, apparently they were not too happy with their white "silver" coating, and I don't blame them - so they opted for the Cast Iron sheen but of a higher temperment than the engine Enamel

these are the as before shots

Gregski 03-22-2016 09:50 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
and after the upteenth coat they turned out great, I absolutely love this color now

used the same VHT brand as before except a darker color - do you like?

Gregski 03-22-2016 09:59 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
3 Attachment(s)
and don't forget this little feller

chevybuldr 03-22-2016 11:19 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
http://www.drivenracingoil.com/#prettyPhoto/0/

This man knows what he is talking about. It might sound like just an ad to sell oil but I have met him and read a lot from other people, he knows what he is talking about. Diesel motor oils have had a lot of the ZDDP's removed from their oils. It used to be a common thing to used Delo or Rotella but not anymore. Also the ZDDP's work at a different operating temp. A diesel motor has higher internal engine temps compared to a gas motor. Straight 30 weight is a thing of old. Either use a break-in oil or use a 10-30 with the additive. If you are going to use synthetic then wait about 5,000 miles before making the change.

I have a camshaft at work from a brand new motor. 5 lobes went flat instantly because the mechanic decided he did not need to put in the additive that we gave him. There are so many opinions on this and its an on going debate. Again watch the video its explains a lot.

SkinnyG 03-23-2016 12:43 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
I have a lumpy flat-tappet cam with some fairly stiff valve springs.

I used Comp Cams break-in oil for the first 20 minutes to break in the cam. Then drained the oil (don't look at it, trust me).

I then used Comp Cams break-in-oil to go break in the rings for about 100kms. Then drained the oil.

I currently use Lucas Hot Rod oil with every oil change.

http://www.buylucasoil.com/img/Lucas....%20bottle.jpg

UKNOWME 03-23-2016 12:50 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregski (Post 7532072)

came home from work and turned up the paint booth to 61*F plus and dropped the humidity to the low 40% and busted out my paint guns

That's funny!

SkinnyG 03-23-2016 12:55 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Oh, I also bought a 7/8" ball hone to make sure the lifter bores would allow the new lifters to rotate. No lobes lost yet (over two years of daily driving).

Gregski 03-23-2016 02:13 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
this was the least favorite part of the evening, wire wheelin the pourus intake manifold, but we got her shinin' and cleared it for good measure, maybe the shine will hold

Gregski 03-23-2016 02:16 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
5 Attachment(s)
then it was time for the Main Event

here's how to paint an engine block the hard way, LOL

I swear I spent more time masking this thing than actually shootin it, when its all masked you realize there aint that much to paint after all

used high temp primer on this bad boy first, then the paint went on

that last pic of the can of primer refuses to get posted vertically, sorry fellas

Gregski 03-23-2016 02:23 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
so first the primer, this is the primer for things like the headers, the guy at O'Reillys ordered the wrong one from another store for me, the one I wanted is for painting engines, but oh well this one withstands more heat, if it was the other way around I would not have used the engine primer on the headers, confused yet, good

Gregski 03-23-2016 02:26 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
5 Attachment(s)
and the first coat of paint goes on the engine block

Gregski 03-23-2016 02:29 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
and here it is the finished product, after two light coats and one medium coat as per the instructions

it has been a long time coming fellas, but I love how it turned out, I know it looks like bare metal, but I like that look, no orange, or blue engines for The Greg that's for sure

Gregski 03-23-2016 02:48 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
1 Attachment(s)
well while we are still beating the break-in oil horse to death, I wanted to share that Summit still sells what I was hoping to find at the local parts houses, an old school 30 weight break-in motor oil, now I aint gonna order my oil, I am just gonna git some cheap 10W-30 and dump some Zinc additive to it, and call it good, it aint needed for more than about a 100 miles anyway

enaberif 03-23-2016 08:01 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
100 miles?! The break oil is only required for the first 25 minute run @ 2,000rpm. Once you have done that you drop the oil and replace it with fresh oil.

Once you have fresh oil then you drive the truck like you stole it for 500 miles then drop the oil again and put fresh oil in and then stick to regular intervals.

You need to change the oil immediately after the break in to remove all the small pieces of metal that may come off from all the new parts or you can risk damage internally.

Valarius_Starchaser 03-23-2016 08:41 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregski (Post 7532394)
\I swear I spent more time masking this thing than actually shootin it, when its all masked you realize there aint that much to paint after all

Just like every paint job ever just last weekend I was working on a 65 chevelle I spent more time masking off the rear quarters and roof/inner doors and engine bay than I did shooting the rest of the car. That's something we always joke about in the shop how the painter gets payed the most to do the shortest job. Really though as you've learned the final result isn't in the skill of the painter as much as it is in the skill of the prep

Keep going Greg the end is in sight! :metal:

SkinnyG 03-23-2016 11:28 AM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by enaberif (Post 7532487)
You need to change the oil immediately after the break in to remove all the small pieces of metal that may come off from all the new parts

This is why I said "don't look at it." The sparkling metalflake glimmer in the oil will make you think you just ruined your motor. Don't look at it. If the NEXT oil change looks like that, you have problems. But the first one - don't look.

rusty76 03-23-2016 05:59 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
I'm curious since he didn't replace the bearings will he have as much metal flake in his oil from just the cam swap. I have no idea I'm just curious. Whenever we broke in a new cam we used cheap oil with GM additive(straight six for racing) and run it at 2500rpm for twenty minutes or so. Changed the oil. Went to VR oil and Lucas oil additive and never seemed to have a problem. Though this was on a racing engine.


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