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-   -   Restoring Rusty (https://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/showthread.php?t=645440)

Gregski 03-20-2016 05:21 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
cleaned the other half of the valves this morning and lapped them and the seats in the passenger side Vortec (C 16 9) cylinder head

and finally got to paint the heads,
pic 1 - prepped

pic 2 - first light coat

pic 3 - second light coat

pic 4 - final medium coat
let me know whacha all think

Gregski 03-20-2016 05:24 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty - Painting Vortec Heads
 
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lets see these beauties side by side, a non painted ugly ducklin' and the finished shinny product

Gentlemen let me tell you it felt great to get these in the paint booth finally, you can only imagine

the last pic is my favorite, they look mean, they look like their going fast just sitting there, ha ha

Gregski 03-20-2016 05:29 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
3 Attachment(s)
then it was time for the other side, I swear the sun, the light, and shadows make these heads look seven different colors, but I assure you its one lovely cast iron hue, ha ha

top pic especially doesn't do it justice, its definately not that dark

Gregski 03-20-2016 05:37 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
and then I caught a bit of painting fever, anything but more head cleaning and valve lapping, I swear

so I got ahold of the water pump pulley, remember this filthy guy, and decided it was its turn to shine!

Gregski 03-20-2016 05:39 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
3 Attachment(s)
even rubbed its belly

yeah I'm the guy who lifts the rug when he vacuums, ha ha

I think I cleaned more places that nobody will ever see, than my college roommate all his life, JK

Gregski 03-20-2016 05:49 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
2 Attachment(s)
who says this thread has no fans?!

I love this picture, I could almost post it on a wall (of course in the garage and not the living room honey, geez as if I was ever to replace that hideous painting your mother gave us - I love that oil on wood "A Grotesque Old Woman")

Gregski 03-20-2016 05:50 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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well the tips were a bit rusty and that bothered the Greg so he stripped it to bare metal

now this is art folks

"I find this work menacing/playful because of the way the subaqueous qualities of the metal fan motifs threatens to penetrate a participation in the critical dialogue of the pebble background." not me, got that off of the The Instant Art Critique Phrase Generator - LOL

Gregski 03-20-2016 05:54 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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and into the paint booth it went, this time for a fresh black tuxedo, which got deeper with each light coat of black

Gregski 03-20-2016 06:27 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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man I was having a good day, you could say I was in perfect harmony with the truck today, ha ha

even after shovelin' 4 pounds of dirt out of it, one teaspoon at a time

Gregski 03-20-2016 06:29 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
3 Attachment(s)
thought about going clear on her, but she was too dirty so black she went

ah don't give me that your red bucket is half full nonsense, this ol' thing has a crack in it and it leaks so this is its only purpose in life now

enaberif 03-20-2016 06:59 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Its a bucket weight!

Jake Wade 03-20-2016 07:22 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Nice cleaning job Gregski! If you had seen as many of those things separate as I have you would have probably got a new one:

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pb...del/c10-pickup

I hope you get lucky for a while, you deserve it as hard as you work.

hatzie 03-20-2016 07:31 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
That damper looks like it's seen better days. The Elastomer ring is swelled and there's at least one crack in the elastomer.
The Elastomer ring should look even on a good damper. Either flat or evenly rounded like an o-ring. It shouldn't be recessed below or unevenly swelled above the surface of the iron damper ring and core.

After all the work you've done it'd be a shame to break the crank because the damper ring decided to move.

You don't need an SFI approved ATI damper or Fluidamper for the smallblock you're building. Just get a good quality new 8" Iron damper. It'll last another 42 years.

chevybuldr 03-20-2016 07:39 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by hatzie (Post 7529335)
That damper looks like it's seen better days. The Elastomer ring is swelled and there's at least one crack in the elastomer.
The Elastomer ring should look even on a good damper. Either flat or evenly rounded like an o-ring. It shouldn't be recessed below or unevenly swelled above the surface of the iron damper ring and core.

After all the work you've done it'd be a shame to break the crank because the damper ring decided to move.

You don't need an SFI approved ATI damper or Fluidamper for the smallblock you're building. Just get a good quality new 8" Iron damper. It'll last another 42 years.

I agree looks like it has seen a lot of oil for a long time. Cheap insurance for such a major component.

hatzie 03-20-2016 07:44 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
And... Harmonic Balancers make good doorstops. I've used em on a rope and pulley system as sash weights for auto-closing barn doors too.

enaberif 03-20-2016 08:06 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Harmonic balancers also make good toe bruising weapons.

Gregski 03-20-2016 08:16 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeramy (Post 7516640)
if you unscrew the 5 foot filler the cap should screw right in to the cover

Victory, victory!!! but as you can see it took some doin' can someone explain to me how the plastic tube can rust inside an oily valve cover, lol

Gregski 03-20-2016 08:24 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
3 Attachment(s)
I was showing a lot of love to the top end today and word start to spread that I didn't love the short block no mo, so I gave it some attention and a much needed flush

replacing the freeze plug behind the engine mount, I already did two with the engine in the truck, but now I is using brass ones, wish I had them then

Gregski 03-20-2016 08:25 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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my god this is so much easier with the engine out of the truck!!!

I always use a little bit of the orange gunk on these babies now, after doing my first one twice, lol

I also used 000 steel wool to gently clean up and smooth out the hole

Gregski 03-20-2016 08:30 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
1 Attachment(s)
with the freeze plug out I first ran a couple quarts of steaming hot water through the three water round holes in the block, and then used a garden hose to run water through each of the three holes until it came out clear, it was raining today so the driveway will wash itself

gonna leave the block on its side for the night, so the orange goop dries, and maniana we will turn her over and do the other side, and that will give us 4 total brand new freeze plugs, and that will be good enuff fer me, cause these rascals are tricky wicky, a new plug don't gurantee a no leak situation, I may even cause a leak by messing with one, but in this case this one had scar tissue so I could tell he wanted to move out, so why fix it if it aint broken

chevybuldr 03-20-2016 08:43 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
You replace all the plugs? That one was pretty bad.

Gregski 03-20-2016 08:43 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by hatzie (Post 7519895)
That seal is a cartridge lip grease seal driven into the bore in the cover. Any half decent engine gasket kit will have it...

This darn timing cover seal is about the only thing that kicked my butt today, I was able to get the rubber piece out using a flat screw driver, but am I supposed to pop out that metal ring, cause it don't wanna come out

I pretty much tried everything to no avail

Gregski 03-20-2016 08:46 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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here's what the new replacement seal looks like, and its got a hard outer edge, so its not like it would go in with that lip on both sides of the cover

question is which way does it go in, which way is front and which way is back, know what I'm sayin'

Gregski 03-20-2016 08:47 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chevybuldr (Post 7529460)
You replace all the plugs? That one was pretty bad.

gonna do the two on each side of the block, so four total, not touching the 2 in the back nor the two in the front, I plan on regretting that later

Jake Wade 03-20-2016 08:54 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Support the cover on 2 blocks of wood and use a punch/hammer to drive the seal out.

Reinstall new seal(after painting cover) with seal facing out as seen in the second picture.

KevinCowTown 03-20-2016 08:58 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregski (Post 7529461)
This darn timing cover seal is about the only thing that kicked my butt today, I was able to get the rubber piece out using a flat screw driver, but am I supposed to pop out that metal ring, cause it don't wanna come out

I pretty much tried everything to no avail

You are fighting a lot of surface to surface adhesion (the entire outside surface area of that old seal) rusted or stuck to the timing cover.

Before you put a torch and a lot of heat to it (and risk warping the timing cover) would you take your dremel and a little cut-off wheel and carefully cut a slot in the collar/ rim of the seal? If you can weaken it there you can probably collapse the seal, prying it away from the inside radius of the timing cover with the tip of a flat head screwdriver?

No warranty with my advice.

chevybuldr 03-20-2016 08:59 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregski (Post 7529471)
gonna do the two on each side of the block, so four total, not touching the 2 in the back nor the two in the front, I plan on regretting that later

Yea those are rusted just as bad as the ones you took out. The fronts wouldn't be bad, but the back you have to pull the trans out. You know those only leak when you are away from home. I think everybody would agree do it now.

Gregski 03-20-2016 09:05 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
4 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinCowTown (Post 7529482)
You are fighting a lot of surface to surface adhesion (the entire outside surface area of that old seal) rusted or stuck to the timing cover.

Before you put a torch and a lot of heat to it (and risk warping the timing cover) would you take your dremel and a little cut-off wheel and carefully cut a slot in the collar/ rim of the seal? If you can weaken it there you can probably collapse the seal, prying it away from the inside radius of the timing cover with the tip of a flat head screwdriver?

No warranty with my advice.

your suggestion made me think, and man that thing was in there so tight I almost thought it was all one piece joined together in holy matrimony,

but I took some pliers and went around and bent the lip out, so it became a pipe instead of bent in, that also made the metal crack sorta like cutting it like you suggested, then using what is quickly becoming my favorite tool THE VISE GRIPS I ripped her right out, I guess the secret was going out there late at night in my pijamas, and not being skierd!

Gregski 03-20-2016 09:11 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jake Wade (Post 7529480)
Support the cover on 2 blocks of wood and use a punch/hammer to drive the seal out.

Bro I tried that already, and all it did was just bend the lip out in a thousand directions, that's how stubborn she was.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jake Wade (Post 7529480)
Reinstall new seal(after painting cover) with seal facing out as seen in the second picture.

Perfect, thank you so much for helping me out

Gregski 03-20-2016 09:20 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by enaberif (Post 7528999)

oh goodness, time to go to PJC - Permatex Junior College there are so many thread sealants - oh I see, you recommend the good stuff the High Temp, nice!

Gregski 03-20-2016 09:31 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
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naturally I already own this one, two tubes mind you, LOL one not even opened, so what the heck is this Permatex ANTI-SEIZE 133A stuff for?

their website reads:

"A highly refined blend of aluminum, copper and graphite lubricants. Use during assembly to prevent galling, corrosion and seizing due to weathering or chemicals. Anti-Seize assures easier disassembly.

Temperature range: -60F to 1600F (-51C to 871C).

Salt, corrosion and moisture resistant – ideal for marine use."


Fellas I aint trying to be difficult or stubborn, I know you have shown me what to use specifically, but I don't want to just blindly use something, I want to comprehend it, know what I mean? Plus I hate buying stuff when I already have some stuff. I just hope its the right stuff.

Valarius_Starchaser 03-20-2016 09:37 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
that is good to put on brake parts or other things not touched often to prevent the bolts from getting rusted into their threads its good for nothing else and should never be used to seal a water jack to put it simply
https://cessnachick.files.wordpress....a-bad-time.png
If you use that on your water jacket head bolt

Jake Wade 03-20-2016 09:43 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
It is a thread lubricant to prevent galling. I am a Millwright at a paper mill and we use TONS of it on fasteners, especially stainless. Prevents galling and makes life easier when removing bolts/nuts.

I would not use it on anything internal for your engine. The stuff has a metallic compound to it that would not be good mixing with engine lubrication.

Good for, exhaust fasteners, motor mount fasteners, accessory bracket fasteners, etc.

Gregski 03-20-2016 09:44 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Valarius_Starchaser (Post 7529536)
that is good to put on brake parts or other things not touched often to prevent the bolts from getting rusted into their threads its good for nothing else and should never be used to seal a water jack

LOL, thank you, that makes sense I appreciate it - did I mention Chemistry is not my strong suite

and I found where I used this stuff, looks like back in Thread 430 Thermostat Bolts heck maybe even the Intake Manifold bolts, no wonder it leaked!!!

enaberif 03-20-2016 09:54 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
When you put the new seal into the cover if you haven't already make sure that little lip is perfectly or as close to perfect as you can get.

Then before you install the seal put a small amount of black rtv around the edge and then install. When you put the cover back on put a small amount of grease on the crank snout to prevent any binding of rubber against steel.

Gregski 03-20-2016 10:05 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jake Wade (Post 7529539)
It is a thread lubricant to prevent galling. I am a Millwright at a paper mill and we use TONS of it on fasteners, especially stainless. Prevents galling and makes life easier when removing bolts/nuts.

I would not use it on anything internal for your engine. The stuff has a metallic compound to it that would not be good mixing with engine lubrication.

Good for, exhaust fasteners, motor mount fasteners, accessory bracket fasteners, etc.

lots of good info here, please elaborate on the "exhaust fasteners" comment, do you mean exhaust manifold bolts, or bolts further down like header collector bolts

Gregski 03-20-2016 10:17 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
1 Attachment(s)
gentlemen I don't mean to beat a dead horse to death, I swear, you are really helping me out here, so 2 more questions I promise

1. what about this ARP Thread Sealer part number 100-9904 I found - what is this meant for? I know threads but which ones, head bolts, exhaust manifold bots, intake manifold bolts, water pump?

Valarius_Starchaser 03-20-2016 10:18 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregski (Post 7529564)
lots of good info here, please elaborate on the "exhaust fasteners" comment, do you mean exhaust manifold bolts, or bolts further down like header collector bolts

I've done both not sure what others do somehow I still manage to break of manifold bolts and studs :waah:

Valarius_Starchaser 03-20-2016 10:20 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
That ARP thread sealant will be good for any water jacket application and anything up to 550 degrees and is even good on fuel fittings

worth the few extra bucks to not send coolant into your engine "ask how I know"

enaberif 03-20-2016 10:23 PM

Re: Restoring Rusty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregski (Post 7529564)
lots of good info here, please elaborate on the "exhaust fasteners" comment, do you mean exhaust manifold bolts, or bolts further down like header collector bolts

Any type of fastener that has can have a tendency to "seize" in place. This can be due to moisture, metal on metal etc.

Sometimes you will use it in place where two different types of metal exist such as aluminum and steel which can corrode together.


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